Comment policy

A summer dinner party in Georgia. (Image cc AtlPoster)

A metaphor

If we get invited to someone’s home for dinner, it might be alarming at first to discover that someone sitting next to us has a different point of view than we do. But then we might find it to be wonderfully enjoyable. We can learn to see the world in new ways, develop a new appreciation for life. Differences can be beautiful.

What doesn’t work so good is if someone at a dinner party causes a scene, or fails completely to follow basic rules of etiquette and human decency. This can ruin the event for everyone. Such a person might not be invited back again, or might even be asked to leave.

We at The Sequim Times see participating in online discussions as being similar. It can either be a wonderful experience or a depressing one, depending on the environment and whether a few simple rules are followed.

Rules

You’re welcome to join us and share your stories, views and opinions, so long as you:

  1. Contribute something to the topic being discussed, and stay on topic, for the most part1We like it when people use simple, clear language, express their opinions, and, if applicable, provide accurate information with sources. We’re not big on people who try to discredit others with vague remarks, sweeping generalizations, circular logic, etc.
  2. Show a little respect for others2An example of this would be the notion of “hate the sin, not the sinner.” We can hate someone’s behavior, but hating other people themselves tends to lead toward more problems rather than solutions.

Moderators will manually approve comments from brand new people, and other people can generally have their comments go live immediately. If this doesn’t seem to work well, we might revise our policies.

Anonymity

When leaving comments, you can choose to provide your full name, first name only, a nickname, or a pseudonym. We just ask that you stick to one name, generally speaking.

Thank you for joining us!

Footnotes

  • 1
    We like it when people use simple, clear language, express their opinions, and, if applicable, provide accurate information with sources. We’re not big on people who try to discredit others with vague remarks, sweeping generalizations, circular logic, etc.
  • 2
    An example of this would be the notion of “hate the sin, not the sinner.” We can hate someone’s behavior, but hating other people themselves tends to lead toward more problems rather than solutions.

7 thoughts on “Comment policy

  1. Kathleen KeehnKathleen Keehn

    Thanks for the invitation to participate in the new Sequim Times. I look forward to sharing with other community members who have similar values and good table manners too!

    5
    Reply
  2. J.A.LarsonJ.A.Larson

    I look forward to this new platform and hopefully we can keep all the “Karens” out of it!! We must we must be wise as serpents and gentle as doves.

    4
    Reply

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